Category: Relationships

Wedding Math: Spending Thoughtfully

Wedding Math: Spending Thoughtfully

First, I’d like to say thank you to my Mom and Stepdad for saving diligently throughout your careers and helping to pay for a large part of the wedding.  Full disclosure: I wanted to elope, but my mom wouldn’t let me.  She was determined to see her only daughter get married, and said she would no longer speak to the Wanderer if he let me go through with eloping.  Since that’s not a good way to start a marriage, we decided we had better do the thing.  So I guess the TLDR of low-cost-to-you weddings is “threaten to elope.”  Just kidding!  How to ensure thoughtful spending that feels meaningful for everyone?

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Useful Graduation Gift Ideas

Useful Graduation Gift Ideas

I’m a huge advocate for giving useful and thoughtful gifts for all occasions.  Graduations are no exception.  I feel that items don’t have to be new, as long as they are good quality.  However, you should always recognize preferences of the receivers of your gifts and consider what they’d actually appreciate.

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Adventures with Engagement Rings

Adventures with Engagement Rings

Huge kudos to my partner for nailing my ring.  Having never been engagement ring shopping before, I had no idea of what I wanted.  I like clean lines and delicate details.  I definitely wanted something durable (I’m accident prone, although my partner kindly calls me all-terrain).  Most importantly, I knew that I wanted something custom that came from the heart.

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Parents: Open a Roth IRA for Your Child

Parents: Open a Roth IRA for Your Child

Opening a Roth IRA is the biggest thing you can do to give your child (or your grandchild) a head start on their path to financial independence.  The money deposited today has the potential for 50-60 years of tax-free growth. You can open the Roth IRA for them at Fidelity. As the adult, you control the account until age 18, even if it’s in the child’s name.  (It does have to be registered with their social security number.)  At age 18, the account is theirs, so don’t tell them about the account until later if they are not good with money.  Just think of that extra 18 years of compounding before they even reach adulthood!

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